A longtime vacant building in Three Rivers could be getting a facelift

The Three Rivers City Commission Tuesday placed a resolution on file for 30 days authorizing the sale of 111 S. Main St. to Jamie Clark of Clark Logic for $1. (Alek Haak-Frost|Watershed Voice)

The building located at 111 S. Main St., known to most downtown Three Rivers residents as “the Whitehouse,” could soon see much needed TLC after sitting vacant since the 1980s. The Three Rivers City Commission Tuesday placed a resolution on file for 30 days authorizing the sale of 111 S. Main St. to Jamie Clark of Clark Logic for $1.

Clark, who has purchased and redeveloped several properties in Three Rivers over the last several years, intends to redevelop the property into downtown apartments, according to City Manager Joe Bippus. The former home of Whitehouse Manufacturing, and what was originally an appliance store after World War II, has been considered for redevelopment by several parties over the years, including a potential landing spot for the Three Rivers Public Library way back when, but none of those plans came to fruition.

Bippus said Clark has been interested in the property for some time, and as recently as a few years ago hired an architect review the facility, and draw up plans to convert the building into apartments. Bippus added that following the 30-day waiting period the City of Three Rivers and Clark will need to discuss a development for the project to provide a timeframe for repairs to the exterior of the building.

In other business the commission…

•Adopted a resolution to change the name of Hov Aire Drive to L Channey Drive in honor of the late Rev. Luther D. Channey who died in 2006 at the age of 70. Channey was the pastor of All Nations Temple Church of God in Christ in Three Rivers for 41 years.

•Accepted a draft ordinance and scheduled a public hearing for July 6 for “Mobile Vending Courts,” or more simply, designated places for local food trucks to setup shop. While the city allows food trucks to apply for licensing, the city will consider an amendment to Chapter 30 of the city code that would allow multiple food trucks in certain zoning districts. The ordinance amendment would define and establish provisions for food trucks congregating at a single location “including standards for utilities, parking, public spaces and business licensing (as a supplement to City Code Chapter 5), as well as public safety considerations.”

Alek Haak-Frost is executive editor of Watershed Voice.

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