WSV’s Aundrea Sayrie writes, “One gets weary. Not including last week, Newsweek reports that an additional 181 Black people have been murdered at the hands of police since George Floyd, and it hasn’t been a year. When Derek Chauvin’s verdict was read last week, I did not rejoice. I did not feel excitement of any sort. I was in total shock witnessing the anomaly of accountability of a police officer. This never happens.”

“Commenting, and reposting requires so little effort and happens so fast, it’s easy to not even realize you’re participating by casting your stone. Recently a local prosecutor whom I have never crossed paths with was the subject of local cancel culture. I can’t identify the guy in a lineup, but plenty of folks have strong opinions about the direction of his future. It was apparent while watching his character be crucified in the comment section.”

“Why do we resort to ignoring every fiber of our being to appease others? Everywhere I look, I see people who are crippled by the fear of what might happen if they were to veer from tradition, or religious indoctrination. Placing the opinions of others above their own authenticity. Forcing themselves towards “achievement” as approved by society. We are prone to do this, although it is a well-known fact that you can’t please everyone.
When you are making decisions for the heart, and in line with your purpose you cannot even rely on a majority vote.”

“There are many painful truths living and being aware as an American minority. One being the road to reconstruction is hard. But the call for justice reform is a torch that must be carried, a light that cannot be snuffed out. Nothing is going to change until the system is dismantled and reconstructed. Preferably with everyone effected present during the conversations. It can happen. It has to. Policy over everything.”

“When someone is grieving one of the best things to do is just be present. Your presence was felt Three Rivers. I balled afterward and finally regained a sense of peace knowing that so many others care, are willing to have the hard conversations, and take a stand against injustice. After all of the mourning, there was joy.”