This episode is the first of the mini-series, Theory in Theology. A+scribe chops it up with Joseph L. Tucker Edmonds, an Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Africana Studies at Indiana University’s School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI as well as the Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture. Together, they explore the theological context through which we can begin answering the question: Is Critical Race Theory compatible with the Gospel?

Reading in Righteousness explores various books from a widespread of Black authors who focus on topics related to antiracism in the Black Christian context, or as it applies. In this first installment, Malachi A+scribe reads ‘Biblical & Social Justice: What Is It? An Everyday Person’s Guide to Understanding Justice And the Role of the Church in Our Society’ and is joined by author Bryan Hudson.

Alek and Doug discuss all things Austin, as Alek heads to Texas for the Independent News Sustainability Summit and 2022 LION Local Journalism Awards. The pair go over which categories Watershed Voice nominated for, Doug decides which sessions Alek and Deborah will attend at the summit, and Alek talks about being a writing mentor for the Voices of Youth program in Kalamazoo.

Alek and Doug are joined by #MomLife columnist Steph Hightree, and Mark Quinn of Heart 2 Heart Autism Center to discuss the Three Rivers-based center and the services it provides. The quartet also talks about the importance of respite care, the stigma and misconceptions surrounding autism, and coping mechanisms for parents/caregivers of children who have autism and/or other cognitive disorders.

Alek and Doug return to their respective mics to discuss what went down at the Watershed Voice Artist Showcase last weekend, why Doug wasn’t there, and why taking multiple plane rides and attending a handful of summer weddings before your friend’s big event isn’t conducive to co-hosting. So join us, as Alek unintentionally sets the world record for saying “incredible” the most times in a 40-minute podcast, and Doug waxes poetic about humpback whales.