WSV’s Deborah Haak-Frost writes, “As I write this, April – Earth Month – has just come to a close. I’m admiring the seedlings awaiting daylight in the windowsill; I’m recycling my local pizza box from dinner; and I’m pleased at the Biden administration’s announcement about reducing greenhouse gas emissions. As wonderful as those things are, I’m actually here to talk about something else. I’m here to talk about menstruation.”

This is Part 2 of a two-part review of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier. You should listen to Part 1 first on the I Can MARVEL All Day podcast. A+scribe is joined by good friends Camara Wallace and rapper Ty Luv the MC to celebrate all things black in the mini-series while using it as a critical lens for looking at modern day policing.

Over the last two years, under the leadership of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and former Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Director Robert Gordon, Michigan made it easier to get and keep important benefits. The state now provides additional resources to low-income individuals, seeks to treat residents with respect and has reduced pointless complexity. Many challenges remain and the department’s new leader, Elizabeth Hertel, has an opportunity to accelerate these improvements.

WSV’s Steph Hightree writes, “I like that April helps shine a light on autism by celebrating Autism Awareness Month but what I really wish they would celebrate is Autism Acceptance Month. With one in 54 people being autistic we really need to change our focus to acceptance versus awareness. Everyone should be aware by now. Autism is here and it’s not going away. But the acceptance part is when things start to change. Acceptance starts with you. When you accept the fact that life is different now and that your child will be living a life that you may not have been prepared for, your life will become easier.”

WSV’s Amy East writes, “Two years ago when we bought our place in beautiful Cass County, I dove into the county’s and my own family’s history, discovering that my ties to the area went deeper than I’d known. There is a richness to the county’s intertwined Potawatomi, European, and African American history that I’d never learned in school, or maybe never appreciated.

“Earlier this year, the Cass County Board of Commissioners saw fit to appoint me to the Historical Commission. As part of the publications committee, I’ll be editing and updating books that share our history with anyone who cares to read about it. Will there be an opportunity for more archaeology, maybe here at home? I’d like to think so, I hope so. There are many, many questions to be answered and stories to be told. Give me a couple years and we’ll see what I can do.”

WSV’s Aundrea Sayrie writes, “One gets weary. Not including last week, Newsweek reports that an additional 181 Black people have been murdered at the hands of police since George Floyd, and it hasn’t been a year. When Derek Chauvin’s verdict was read last week, I did not rejoice. I did not feel excitement of any sort. I was in total shock witnessing the anomaly of accountability of a police officer. This never happens.”

Welcome to Screen Tea Podcast! Put away that Quietus box in favor of listening to Lisha and Jules go on and on about Alfonso Cuaron’s 2006 sci-fi thriller Children of Men! Find a nice spot in the UK countryside (preferably far away from Charlie Hunnam’s wig) and tune in as Lisha fantasizes about swapping secondary and main characters, Jules gets to properly geek out over one of her favorite sci-fi flicks, and both of your hosts lean hard into Michael Caine’s Lennon impression. This is not a happy film, but it is a ridiculous episode, so enjoy anyway!

Doug & Alek are joined by Watershed Voice Columnist and Office Manager Steph Hightree to discuss parenting during a pandemic, how paramount in-school counseling has been for her daughter Cadence, the trials and triumphs of her son Nathan, the joys of camping and her dogged pursuit of a Playstation 5 for her husband in the first of two back-to-back episodes with Ms. #MomLife herself.

Doug and Alek are joined by Pastor Devon Miller of Florence Church of the Brethren Mennonite to discuss what it’s like leading a congregation during a global pandemic, being a religious leader in the 21st century when so many young people have walked away from the church or were never introduced to it in the first place, and restorative justice as it relates to conflict resolution and healing.